Railway Recruitment

Railway Recruitment

The recruitment in Indian railway was first attempted in 1942, as an experimental measure, under a Service Commission with a Chairman and two members. Later this position was reviewed in 1945 and Service Commissions at Bombay, Calcutta, Madras and Lucknow were set up under the supervision of Ministry of Railway Board. The core job of this Service Commissions was two fold. Apart from recruiting class III staff, they also offer advice to General Managers for dealing with appeals from subordinate staff on disciplinary matters.

However, the first enquiry is about checking if the Commissions are working properly. Later the Commission was directed to give undivided attention to the recruitments.  Chairperson of the Bombay Service Commission was appointed as the Supervisor, who will look after the Commissions at Calcutta, Lucknow and Madras. In 1949, due to financial limitations, recruitments of Indian Railways were suspended for a few days. Therefore, the number of commissions was reduced to one and centrally located at Bombay.

In 1953-54, during the post-independence, when Economic conditions of Indian Railways began improving, railway Recruitment Board again set up four service commissions at Bombay, Madras, Allahabad and Calcutta. In 1956, the Estimates committee generally approved the method of recruitment by the Constitution of the Railway Service Commissions. To meet the requirements of the North Eastern Railway and to facilitate the process of recruitment from the under developed areas of that region, the board had decided to set up the additional commission was set up at Muzaffarpur in 1976. The branch of Calcutta Service Commission was opened at Ranchi.

In due course additional Service Commissions were set up at Secunderabad to cater to the needs of the then newly formed South Central Railway. Recruitment of staff for the needs of NF Railway during this time was carried out by the recruitment committee control by NF Railway.

In 1983, the Government in order to fulfill the needs of areas neglected till date due to locations of the existing commissions, established seven more commissions at Ahmedabad, Ajmer, Bhopal, Bhuvneshwar, Chandigarh, Jammu and Srinagar.  Later in 1984, two more service commissions were again established at Malda and Gorakhpur. The autonomous Service Commission at Ranchi was set up to cater to the exclusive needs of Scheduled tribes of the area.

In January 1985, Railway Service Commissions came to be known as Railway Recruitment Boards (RRBs). Currently, 19 Railway Recruitment Boards are operating throughout India.

The Ministry of Railways (Railway Board) established, Railway Recruitment Control Board (RRCB) in 1998. The functions of RRCB are the following:

  • Formulation of the important policies which are in accordance with the recruitment procedures
  • Close monitoring of the activities of all Railway Recruitment Boards (RRBs) including expenditure incurred for recruitment
  • Evaluating the performance of RRB’s and advising them on priorities
  • Proper organization and management of the  information system for monitoring the work done by RRBs
Today, Railway Recruitment Board is the autonomous body in spite of being governed by the Central Government of India.

The recruitment in Indian railway was first attempted in 1942, as an experimental measure, under a Service Commission with a Chairman and two members. Later this position was reviewed in 1945 and Service Commissions at Bombay, Calcutta, Madras and Lucknow were set up under the supervision of Ministry of Railway Board. The core job of this Service Commissions was two fold. Apart from recruiting class III staff, they also offer advice to General Managers for dealing with appeals from subordinate staff on disciplinary matters.

However, the first enquiry is about checking if the Commissions are working properly. Later the Commission was directed to give undivided attention to the recruitments.  Chairperson of the Bombay Service Commission was appointed as the Supervisor, who will look after the Commissions at Calcutta, Lucknow and Madras. In 1949, due to financial limitations, recruitments of Indian Railways were suspended for a few days. Therefore, the number of commissions was reduced to one and centrally located at Bombay.

In 1953-54, during the post-independence, when Economic conditions of Indian Railways began improving, railway Recruitment Board again set up four service commissions at Bombay, Madras, Allahabad and Calcutta. In 1956, the Estimates committee generally approved the method of recruitment by the Constitution of the Railway Service Commissions. To meet the requirements of the North Eastern Railway and to facilitate the process of recruitment from the under developed areas of that region, the board had decided to set up the additional commission was set up at Muzaffarpur in 1976. The branch of Calcutta Service Commission was opened at Ranchi.

In due course additional Service Commissions were set up at Secunderabad to cater to the needs of the then newly formed South Central Railway. Recruitment of staff for the needs of NF Railway during this time was carried out by the recruitment committee control by NF Railway.

In 1983, the Government in order to fulfill the needs of areas neglected till date due to locations of the existing commissions, established seven more commissions at Ahmedabad, Ajmer, Bhopal, Bhuvneshwar, Chandigarh, Jammu and Srinagar.  Later in 1984, two more service commissions were again established at Malda and Gorakhpur. The autonomous Service Commission at Ranchi was set up to cater to the exclusive needs of Scheduled tribes of the area.

In January 1985, Railway Service Commissions came to be known as Railway Recruitment Boards (RRBs). Currently, 19 Railway Recruitment Boards are operating throughout India.

The Ministry of Railways (Railway Board) established, Railway Recruitment Control Board (RRCB) in 1998. The functions of RRCB are the following:

  • Formulation of the important policies which are in accordance with the recruitment procedures
  • Close monitoring of the activities of all Railway Recruitment Boards (RRBs) including expenditure incurred for recruitment
  • Evaluating the performance of RRB’s and advising them on priorities
  • Proper organization and management of the  information system for monitoring the work done by RRBs
Today, Railway Recruitment Board is the autonomous body in spite of being governed by the Central Government of India.

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